Developmental Services Update – Respite Cap Lifted as of 1/1/2018 

IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT SERVICES  
Due to recent changes in the law, you may be eligible for more respite hours as of January 1, 2018.  Your Regional Center encourages you to speak with your Service Coordinator to find out more and begin planning now.

INFORMACION IMPORTANTE ACERCA DE SERVICIOS
Debido a recientes cambios en la ley, usted puede ser elegible para más horas de relevo (respite) a partir del 01 de Enero de 2018.  Your Regional Center le anima a hablar con su Coordinador de servicios para obtener más información y comenzar a planificar ahora.

State of Emergency Billing Instructions for NBRC Vendors posted

Dear Vendor Community,

It is our sincere hope that this memo finds you on the road to recovery after such a horrific sequence of events these past few weeks. In a time of such disaster, it was amazing to see our communities pull together to take care of each other.

North Bay Regional Center will honor State of Emergency (SOE) billing for the month of October 2017. This memo: SOE Billing information 10-2017 will provide guidance for October SOE billing for Napa, Sonoma and Solano counties.

Sonoma County law enforcement and people with autism gather to teach each other

JULIE JOHNSON
THE PRESS DEMOCRAT | September 21, 2017

Volunteering from the audience, Andrew Kirk of Sonoma sat on a chair on stage at a Sonoma County church for a demonstration of a hypothetical arrest.

Cotati Police Officer Tyler Wardle held him at gunpoint — using a fake rubber weapon in a day-glow orange — while Petaluma Police Officer Tyler Saldanha pulled his arms behind his back and applied handcuffs.

Read more… 

‘The Good Doctor’ Gets Boost From Real MD With Disability

PASCAGOULA, Miss. — An ABC News “20/20” film crew arrived at Singing River Hospital recently to interview Dr. Tyler Sexton, a staff pediatrician who overcame the odds and became a doctor even with cerebral palsy.

The network is using his inspiring story to help promote a story of their own — a new television series, “The Good Doctor,” that debuts Sept. 25 at 10 p.m. ET.

Read more…

Disabled placards for thousands of dead Californians part of program abuse

BY JIM MILLER – jmiller@sacbee.comMy feed

New faces of autism in ‘Sesame Street,’ ‘Power Rangers’ movie could help dispel stereotypes

Study: Medicaid block grants would save feds $150 billion

A Republican proposal to fund Medicaid through block grants could save the federal government more than $100 billion over five years, according to a new analysis released Monday.

The analysis from healthcare firm Avalere Health shows that if Medicaid were funded through block grants instead of through the open-ended commitment the program receives now, the federal government would save $150 billion by 2022.

Similarly, shifting to per capita caps, in which states would receive a set amount of money per beneficiary, would save $110 billion over five years.

“Medicaid block grants and per capita caps serve as vehicles to control federal spending on the program and put more of the decision-making on things like covered services and program eligibility in the hands of the states,” said Avalere president Dan Mendelson.Congressional Republicans argue that changing Medicaid’s funding mechanism would give states more control over their programs. Democrats say that beneficiaries would face slashed benefits under either proposal, while states would face more costs.

According to the study, only one state – North Dakota — would see increased funding under the block grant model.

The remaining states and Washington, D.C. would face a reduction in federal funding.

Through per capita funding, 26 states and D.C. would see decreases in federal funding while 24 would get an increase.

The proposals are also opposed by AARP.

“AARP opposes Medicaid block grants and per capita caps because we are concerned that such proposals will endanger the health, safety, and care of millions of individuals who depend on the essential services provided through Medicaid,” Joyce Rogers, AARP’s senior vice president for government affairs, wrote in a letter to lawmakers last week.

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